March 27, 2022

Quality of Life enforcement #BrokenWindows #NYPD #KeechantSewell #Crime #KennethCorey #Safety

Quality of Life enforcement #BrokenWindows #NYPD #KeechantSewell #Crime #KennethCorey #Safety

Quality of Life Enforcement #BrokenWindows #NYPD #KeechantSewell #Crime #KennethCorey #SafetyPolice Commissioner Keechant L. Sewell today announced a citywide initiative in response to the increased numbers of shootings and thefts in New York City, as well as the rise in quality-of-life offenses that contribute to crime and disorder.  The initiative – a response to the public-safety concerns of everyday New Yorkers – will deploy NYPD officers across boroughs and bureaus. They will work in tandem to rapidly identify and respond to crime trends and to address the conditions that fuel them.  "As I stated on my first day as Commissioner, after visiting an officer who was shot two hours and thirty-nine minutes into the New Year, there are too many people carrying illegal guns and too many people willing to use them,” said NYPD Police Commissioner Keechant L. Sewell. “That has to change. Now."  The NYPD recently enhanced its targeted gun-enforcement efforts with the deployment of the department’s new Neighborhood Safety Teams. Now, uniformed officers on patrol will be augmenting the mission of these Safety Teams by expanding their focus beyond 911 calls. They will be performing a proven best practice for reducing violent crime: proactive engagement with offenders who commit violations that lead up to an act of violence – whether on the streets, in the transit system, or in our public housing developments.  This enforcement initiative is community-driven, and is a direct response to the victims of violent crime. We must address every public-safety concern, in every New York City neighborhood, and we will never tolerate any increased threats to the people we serve.  Often, the community complaints that can be precursors to violence include: the open-air selling of narcotics, including marijuana; public drinking; public urination; dice games that lead to disputes and shootings; and the dangers of unlicensed, unregistered, or uninsured drivers operating on the most crowded city streets in the nation.  "These are the things that people are calling to complain about," said Chief of Department Kenneth Corey, "and the NYPD owes them a response. And while most encounters begin with a warning, when our officers see someone ignoring those warnings there will be enforcement."  Over the last weekend, including through Monday of this week, New York City saw 31 shootings where people were struck by bullets. One of those wounded was a 7-year old girl – an unintended victim caught in the crossfire of two rival gangs.

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